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Showing posts from July, 2010

WCF Hosted on a Network Share

Whilst working on a proof of concept WCF service I ran into an interesting security “zone” issue which caused me a few headaches for an afternoon.  I was moving some code out of a prototype WinForm application into a WCF service to prove and demonstrate the next phase of the infrastructure.  The functionality in question reference some custom ‘C’ libraries which had already been proven to run when referenced locally within the Windows application.  However moving the same the code and therefore the reference to the ‘C’ libraries into a WCF service resulted in most calls to the library throwing a “Security Exception”.  Stepping through the debugger, the issue was clear enough, calling “unsafe” code requires Full Trust but even though everything was running locally the WCF service was showing as “Internet” zone and triggering the security exception.   This had me confused for quite a while, I wasn’t hosting the WCF service within IIS (see previous post, no admin rights!), so my only opt…

Is .NET development possible without Admin Rights?

I guess the obvious answer is “yes” as there is always notepad and command line compilation, but if you want to use Visual Studio or do anything with IIS, Message Queues, etc. then the answer quickly becomes a frustrating no!  This hasn’t usually been a problem, but having just started in a new job which is just starting out in .NET I’m finding what a frustrating experience not having admin rights can be.  Visual Studio (2008) has been installed so that’s one hurdle out of the way, but a trial install of Resharper needs admin rights, as does NUnit.  I see MS are trying to make things better with a non-admin version of IIS7 (called IIS Express) around the corner which needs VS2010 (another thing on the shopping list).  But until the Visual Studio toolset can be installed using a non-admin account, it’s going to continue to be a frustrating experience!