Skip to main content

How to stand out in a phone interview

I can still remember my first phone interview for a job. I had no idea what to expect so really wasn't looking forward to it, but it can't have gone too badly because I got the job. Now that I've been lucky enough to progress in my career to positions where I'm conducting the other side of the phone interview I've been quite surprised how little it takes to stand out from the crowd:

1. Be Prepared
When booking the interview, consider how much time you'll need to get to where you can comfortably take the call. When the interviewer phones you'll want to be nice and relaxed and able to take the call within a couple of rings. If you're struggling to find your phone, not drop any paper work or find a place out of the wind / pull over in your car you will already be putting yourself on the back foot.

2. Smile when you speak
Don't sound like you've just been called at 6am on your day off! When you answer the call make sure you sound happy and show that you are looking forward to speaking with the interviewer. They may have lined up several phone interviews that day and if you're the only one that sounded happy / pleased to speak with the interviewer; guess who they are going to remember!

3. Show that you were expecting the call
At the very least you should try to say "Hello, {{your name}}", even better say "Hello, {{your name}}. Is that {{interviewer's name}}. It's good to remember that the interviewer has been given your number from the recruiter and is probably hoping they've got the right number (it does happen) or they've entered it correctly (also can happen). By doing this small thing you are both helping the interviewer and showing that you were expecting their call. You're also helping to sell yourself from the outset in showing that you would be a great representative for the company if you were to be successful.

4. Expect a bad mobile signal
Technology is great, but chances are the phone company will wait until just before your interview to take the nearest mobile transmitter out of service. If the signal is bad, don't try to make do during the call, acknowledge the problem to the interviewer; ideally offer an alternative number (land line / skype) to use instead or just to try reconnecting the call (it's amazing the number of times that cures the issue). If you are answering a question with a long answer, make sure you give chances for the interviewer to confirm that they are still on the call.


And there you have it, just 4 really simple points to standing out in a phone interview; but please remember that sometimes you can do this and more and still it just won't be your day!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Mocking HttpCookieCollection in HttpRequestBase

When unit testing ASP.NET MVC2 projects the issue of injecting HttpContext is quickly encountered.  There seem to be many different ways / recommendations for mocking HttpContextBase to improve the testability of controllers and their actions.  My investigations into that will probably be a separate blog post in the near future but for now I want to cover something that had me stuck for longer than it probably should have.  That is how to mock non abstract/interfaced classes within HttpRequestBase and HttpResponseBase – namely the HttpCookieCollection class.   The code sample below illustrates how it can be used within a mocked instance of HttpRequestBase.  Cookies can be added / modified within the unit test code prior to being passed into the code being tested.   After it’s been called, using a combination of MOQ’s Verify and NUnit’s Assert it is possible to check how many times the collection is accessed (but you have to include the set up calls) and that the relevant cookies have …

Injecting HttpContextBase into an MVC Controller

It is a shame that when the ASP.NET MVC framework was released they did not think to build IoC support into the infrastructure. All the major components of the MVC engine appear to magically inherit instances of HttpContext and it’s related objects – which can cause no end of problems if you are trying to utilise Unit Testing and IoC. Reading around various articles on the subject just to get around this one problem requires the implementation of several different concepts and you are still left with a work around. The code below, along with the other links referenced in this article is my stab at resolving the issue. There’s probably nothing new here, but it does attempt to relate all the information needed to do this for Castle Windsor. The overview is that all controllers will need to inherit from a base controller, which takes an instance of HttpContext into it’s constructor. It then overrides the property HttpContext in the main controller class, supplying it’s own version…

Problem installing AWS CLI

It never feels like a good start when you're trying to start out with something and the install fails with an obscure error! I was just trying to install the Amazon CLI following the instructions at https://aws.amazon.com/cli/ and ran into the following error when running 'pip install awscli': Collecting awscli Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement awscli (from versions: ) No matching distribution found for awscli I appeared to have a correct version of Python installed (v2.7) and checking "PIP -v" indicated that 9.0.1 was installed. That all seemed to tick the required boxes but digging around a little more I did see that some people had had issues with various versions of PIP so I found / ran the following to upgrade to the latest vesion: curl https://bootstrap.pypa.io/get-pip.py -o get-pip.py python get-pip.py This installed v9.0.3 of PIP which burst into life when I re-ran 'pip install awscli' and everything seems to be ok. Like…